Tag Archives: Vocabulary building

Dynamic Assessment:part 2

Hello All,

So today I will write about two of the three tools in my DA toolkit: fast mapping and nonword repetition tasks.

Below is a video of Dr. Crowley and an SLP  demonstrating the task.
Fast mapping video.

In short, fast mapping allows quick incidental learning. The clinician assesses the student’s ability to learn new words from limited exposure quickly. This is different from standardized vocabulary assessments that are greatly influenced by the student’s social economic status (SES). Keep in mind that many of these standardized assessments are also not normed on bilingual/multilingual students.

Also, below is an image of my “picnic basket”. I used the tomatillo and durian and labeled them “kube” and “toeday” respectively.  The “basket” is just an old can for almonds.

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The Nonword repetition task can be found on standardized assessments like the TILLS, but I use the words from Dr. Crowley’s video demonstration. As Dr. Crowley states, nonsense words are a great way to learn about a child’s language skills as well as attention and working memory.

Click here for the video demonstration of the nonsense word repetition task.

Below is a picture of the words from the video with a citation of Dollaghan & Campbell at the bottom. This is the same citation found in the video.

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After reading this post, will you plan to implement any of these tasks as part of your assessment?

JG

Spanish Phrasing for SLPs

Hello All,

I found this little gem of a book while perusing the web and social media today and thought to share! It is a book that is no longer in print but has been made available FREE through pediastaff.com. As the title of this post suggests, the book is called “Spanish Phrasing for SLPs” by Dorothy Miranda Esckelson and Adulfa Aguirre Morales. To directly quote from the intro of the book, “Spanish Phrasing for SLP’S was written to provide speech-language pathologists with language to use with their Spanish-speaking students and their families” (Esckelson & Aguirre Morales, 1998). From my brief review, it has a parent questionnaire with useful questions to ask during a parent interview with the English translation beneath it. My favorite part is the glossary which contains common words and phrases that SLPs use on a daily basis; but in Spanish!

I have not read the entire book…(I literally just found it) but from what I have seen, I will say that an intermediate level of knowledge and use of the Spanish language is recommended to have an effective communication exchange. This includes the ability to pronounce words; especially when speaking/reading in past tense, because those accent marks make a difference!

The direct link to the book is: http://www.pediastaff.com/blog/a-gift-to-the-profession-spanish-phrasing-for-slps-2799

Once you check it out, I would love to hear how helpful it is to you in the comments below!

Reference: Esckelson, D.M., & Aguirre Morales, A. (1998). Spanish phrases for slp’s. Ann Arbor, MI: Language Pathways.

JG