Tag Archives: therapy

When can I consider myself a bilingual SLP?

Hello All,

This question has been one that I have struggled with as a Spanish language learner. Actually, up until recently I was hesitant to consider myself a bilingual SLP because Continue reading →

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FREE ASHA CEUs!!

Happy Friday to All!

I wanted to share with you all two neat CEU Self-Study courses I found developed by Dr. Cate Crowley of Teachers College Columbia University! If you recall, she is an SLP and founder of theLEADERSproject. She shares her knowledge of everything from Assessment approaches like DA, to Cleft palate intervention via her website and Youtube videos.

theLEADERSproject is currently offering two courses for FREE! One is titled Grammar Fundamentals for a Pluralistic Society. It discusses the grammar of several dialects of the English language including Standard American and Spanish-Influenced English. The link to the course is here. This course offers .5 ASHA CEUs.

Another self-study course on the site is titled Differential Diagnosis in Preschool Evaluation: A Case Study. Per the description it is a “step-by-step evaluation process for a preschool-age child.” The link for this course is here. The course offers .6 ASHA CEUs.

As with most online self-study courses, shortly after the lesson, you must complete and pass a test that assesses your knowledge and understanding of the information from the lesson. For both of these courses, you MUST have your ASHA ID number ready before starting the assessment in order for you to get CEU credit.

Have you taken any of the CEU courses offered through theLEADERSproject? Let me know your thoughts!

JG

Spanish Phrasing for SLPs

Hello All,

I found this little gem of a book while perusing the web and social media today and thought to share! It is a book that is no longer in print but has been made available FREE through pediastaff.com. As the title of this post suggests, the book is called “Spanish Phrasing for SLPs” by Dorothy Miranda Esckelson and Adulfa Aguirre Morales. To directly quote from the intro of the book, “Spanish Phrasing for SLP’S was written to provide speech-language pathologists with language to use with their Spanish-speaking students and their families” (Esckelson & Aguirre Morales, 1998). From my brief review, it has a parent questionnaire with useful questions to ask during a parent interview with the English translation beneath it. My favorite part is the glossary which contains common words and phrases that SLPs use on a daily basis; but in Spanish!

I have not read the entire book…(I literally just found it) but from what I have seen, I will say that an intermediate level of knowledge and use of the Spanish language is recommended to have an effective communication exchange. This includes the ability to pronounce words; especially when speaking/reading in past tense, because those accent marks make a difference!

The direct link to the book is: http://www.pediastaff.com/blog/a-gift-to-the-profession-spanish-phrasing-for-slps-2799

Once you check it out, I would love to hear how helpful it is to you in the comments below!

Reference: Esckelson, D.M., & Aguirre Morales, A. (1998). Spanish phrases for slp’s. Ann Arbor, MI: Language Pathways.

JG

Untapped Resource: ESL Teachers

With over 15 IEP/RTI meetings the past two weeks, I have not been able to write a new post! Now that it is spring break (SO grateful!)…I have some time to provide some food for thought on…ESL Teachers.

¿Tienes muchos estudiantes que reciben clases de inglés como segunda lengua? I know I do! but in my journey in understanding how to better service my Spanish ELL students…I never thought to tap into the knowledge of the ESL teacher! My district had a presenter at a recent district meeting who mentioned  the importance in collaborating with the ESL teacher to gain more insight on the type of children that we encounter on our caseload. For example, ESL teachers (whether they speak the primary language of the children or not), may have exposure to students who have the same linguistic background as the ones on your caseload. For example, they can give you information regarding how a first grade student’s language ability is similar to his first grade peers within your school community.

I now have decided to not just include the ESL teacher’s input during assessments, but also when I am writing goals, quarterly progress notes, and conducting annual IEP meetings. They are a valuable resource since they are the other professional in the building that you can discuss second language acquisition skills with as well as the impact on academics!

Have you interacted with your ESL teachers lately? Let me know how in the comments!

JG

Wordless Picture Books In Therapy

Happy Monday!

So, I LOVE incorporating books into my lessons because of the tremendous amount of value they have in facilitating language and articulation during therapy. This school year, I began using wordless picture books with my students–why I waited so long…I do not know?! Wordless picture books take things to another level, especially for English Language Learners (ELLs) because there are.no.words! So it may seem a bit strange for someone unfamiliar with the benefit of wordless picture books to be inclined to ask, “Why use books with no words to teach language?”

Great question! I use them because with them, students can create their own stories in their own words–with respect to their cultural background as well as dialect. This gives me a window into the student’s ability (or lack thereof) to tap into background knowledge, vocabulary, inferencing, syntax and so much more! They are also great as part of your dynamic assessment toolkit; but more on that another day.

An article I found in preparation for this post is a really neat oldie but goodie by Flately & Rutland (1986). The title is: Using wordless picture books to teach linguistically/culturally different students. Its focus is on how to teach reading with the use of picture books, with some awesome strategies that I look forward to implementing with my non ELL students as well!

As I mentioned, I began using wordless picture books in therapy quite recently (better late than never, right?) and below are the ones I have used and ones that are on my list to use soon. Do you have any favorites?

Pancakes for Breakfast – Tomie dePaola
Good Night, Gorilla – Peggy Rathmann
Chalk – Bill Thomson
A Boy, A Dog, and a Frog – Mercer Mayer
Bee and Bird – Craig Frazier
Trainstop – Barbara Lehman

reference: Flately, K. & Rutland, A.D., (1986). Using wordless picture books to teach linguistically/culturally different students. The Reading Teacher, 40(3), 276-281.

JG

Do you conduct your sessions in Spanish?

Now that this Spanglish SLP has finally decided to create a blog, my brain has been in overdrive with ideas and topics that would be beneficial to you as a reader! Since I work within the public school system, many of the topics will be specific to the pediatric population…specifically preschool through 5th grade since those are the grade levels I serve. I have a significant number of Spanish speaking preschoolers this year and I have found myself using more and more Spanish as part of my lesson; especially with the limited English speaking preschoolers.

Because I consider myself an intermediate Spanish speaker, I do have some confidence in administering simple directions and lessons (especially for my preschoolers) in Spanish. Very popular phrases that I find myself using are: “siéntate bien”, “espera un momentito” , “dime en inglés por favor”,  “¿y qué es esto en inglés?”, “repitemelo por favor”,  “¿estas escuchando?” and my favorite for my fidgety little ones “manos quietos.”

What are some of your most common phrases that you use in therapy?

JG